Women are violent too – Accept it.

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Violence Against Men is Less Recognised.

Violence of any kind is not acceptable, and violence against any gender or sex within the home should be stopped. This article is aimed at the fact that violence is not a one way street. Women are violent, and yet it seems as if it is still a ‘dirty little secret’ that those of whom are in authority seem to fail to accept this fact.  As a result men will still be victims at home and continue to be failed by the police, CPS and the courts.

Women who experience domestic violence are openly encouraged to report it to the police. It has been said that men who experience such violence often encounter pressure against reporting, with those that do facing social stigma and questions about their masculinity. Furthermore, violence against men is generally less recognized than violence against women, which can act as a further deterrent to men reporting their situation.

Is The Law Fair And Balanced Or Are The Authorities Out Of Their Depth?

Keith's Story - Male Victim of Domestic Abuse & Depression Women are violent too - Accept it.

Some studies have shown that women who assault their male partners are more likely to avoid arrest than men who attack their female partners, (Lupri, Eugene; Grandin, Elaine (2004). “Intimate partner abuse against men”. January 4, 2009. Retrieved June 21, 2014.) and that female perpetrators of violence are often viewed by the police, CPS and the courts as victims rather than offenders. As such, men fear that if they do report to the police, they will be assumed to be the aggressor, and placed under arrest.

An American Survey

In 1985, the U.S. National Family Violence Survey, carried out representative sample of 41 houses where 1 to 10 calls to the police had been made (24 female callers and 17 male callers), found that;

  • When a woman called the police to report domestic violence, the man was ordered out of the house in 41.4% of cases. However, when a man called, the woman was ordered out of the house in 0% of cases.
  • When a woman called, the man was threatened with immediate arrest in 28.2% of cases; when a man called, the woman was threatened with arrest in 0% of cases.
  • When a woman called, the man was threatened with arrest at a later date in 10.7% of cases; when a man called, the woman was threatened with arrest at a later date in 0% of cases.
  • When a woman called, the man was arrested in 15.2% of cases; when a man called, the woman was arrested in 0% of cases.
  • In 12.1% of cases when the man called, the man himself was arrested

(Gelles, Richard J.; Straus, Murray A. (1985). Intimate Violence: The Causes and Consequences of Abuse in the American Family)

700,000 men are victims of domestic abuse

More than 700,000 men are thought to experience violence from a partner every year – but new research has shown that they risk counter-accusations. The number of women convicted of domestic abuse has quadrupled in the last 10 years, going up to 3,735 in 2013/14 from 806 in 2004/05. It is not immediately clear how many arrests of male perpetrators of abuse against men there have been.

Under Reporting

It has been suggested that under-reporting is an integral problem with domestic abuse. For example, in England and Wales, the 1995 “Home Office Research Study 191”, carried out as a supplementary study to the British Crime Survey, reported 6.6 million incidents of domestic violence in the previous twelve months, compared with the 987,000 incidents found by the Crime Survey. The difference in the two reports was that Study 191 was a questionnaire of a random representative sample of people, while the Crime Survey attained its figures from crime records, i.e. actual reported cases of VIOLENCE (Mirrlees-Black, Catriona (1999). Domestic Violence: Findings from a new British Crime Survey self-completion questionnaire. London: Home Office. pp. 17–26).

Additional studies carried out in 2010 and 2011 found that whilst 27% of women who experienced domestic violence reported it to the police, only 10% of men did so, and whilst 44% of women reported to some professional organization, only 19% of men did so (Britton, Andrew (2011). Homicides, Firearm Offences and Intimate Violence, 2010/2011: Supplementary Volume 2 to Crime in England and Wales, 2010/2011, London: Home Office. p. 96).

My Word Against Yours

Too often it has been heard that “my wife or girlfriend has said if I leave, or tell anyone, she will say I was the one attacking her and she was just defending herself”. In my case my ex made it clear that because I refused to have sex with her and was planning to leave that “I was going to pay for that”. As a result she contacted the police knowing fully well that the law supports the woman in this case regardless of the truth or the evidence.

Self Defence?

In 1996 study of 1,978 people in England, only 21% of women who admitted to committing domestic violence gave self-defense as a reason (Carrado, Michelle; George, Malcolm J.; Loxam, Elizabeth; Jones, L.; Templar, Dale (June 1996). “Aggression in British Heterosexual Relationships: A Descriptive Analysis”. Aggressive Behavior. pg 401–415)

 

Is It Too Much to Expect That There Are Violent Women?

Keith's Story - Male Victim of Domestic Abuse & Depression Women are violent too - Accept it.

(Joanna Dennehy murdered three men  who all died from stab wounds. The bodies of all three men were discovered dumped in ditches outside Peterborough. Joanna Dennehy,  was later sentenced to life imprisonment with a whole life order).

Rates of female violence reported in the UK have increased

Women are far less likely than men to commit crimes, but rates of female violence reported in the UK have increased. The number of girls and women arrested for violence has more than doubled between 1999/2000 and 2007/08. The idea of a woman being violent, even murderous, is shocking. But why? Is violence at the hands of women somehow different to that at the hands of men? Regardless, we don’t treat male and female violence the same (Carrado, Michelle; George, Malcolm J.; Loxam, Elizabeth; Jones, L.; Templar, Dale (June 1996). “Aggression in British Heterosexual Relationships: A Descriptive Analysis”. Aggressive Behavior. 22 (6): 401–415). Society tries to justify their actions with a victim like status.

Keith's Story - Male Victim of Domestic Abuse & Depression Women are violent too - Accept it.

(Tracie Andrews murdered her fiance on 1 December 1996. Tracie was sentenced to life imprisonment after being found guilty of murder at her trial in July 1997 and served 14 years before being released from prison).

 

 

 

Mad, Bad or Sad?

Society either pities the women who commit terrible crimes or try hard to distance ourselves from them. Perhaps it is easier to class woman who abuse or kill as exceptional. Specific cases are elevated to legendary status, and those who commit them are pitied or vilified, rather than understood.

Keith's Story - Male Victim of Domestic Abuse & Depression Women are violent too - Accept it.

(Characterised as “the most evil woman in Britain”, Mira Hindley made several appeals against her life sentence, claiming she was a reformed woman and no longer a danger to society, but was never released. Mira Hindley died in 2002, aged 60. )

 

 

 

Another way to deny female violence is to argue that women act only under the influence of evil men. All too often, women offenders are characterised as ‘mad’ (and so to be pitied, rather than blamed), ‘bad’ (set aside from women as a whole) or ‘sad’ (forced into violence by pressure of circumstance, in retaliation or by coercion).

Keith's Story - Male Victim of Domestic Abuse & Depression Women are violent too - Accept it.

(Rosemary Pauline “Rose” West was convicted of ten murders in 1995. Rosemary’s husband Fred,  is believed to have collaborated with her in the torture and murder of at least nine women between 1973 and 1987)

 

Number of women convicted of domestic violence at record high